Image: Biden pushes American children to develop serious illness or die by getting vaccinated, despite near-zero risk from covid

(Natural News) President Joe Biden urged the unvaccinated, including children, to get injected with the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine as the country recently recorded over one million new infections in a day.

Videos of Biden emerged on social media warning American parents to keep their children away from unvaccinated people and to surround them with people who are vaccinated if their kids are too young to be vaccinated. “There is no excuse for anyone being unvaccinated. This continues to be a pandemic of the unvaccinated,” Biden said.

New research has found that children ages 5 to 11 years of age do not need “unnecessary” COVID-19 vaccines. (Related: Study: COVID “vaccines” provide ZERO benefits for children.)  

Experts say children have an almost zero risk of getting sick from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, yet the Biden administration wants all of them to get injected with “vaccines that could cause them to develop heart disease or die.”

A peer-reviewed study co-authored by viral immunologist and biologist, Dr. Jessica Rose, found that myocarditis rates were significantly higher in people aged 13 to 23 years old within the eight weeks after the injections were first rolled out.

“In an act of censorship, this paper had been temporarily removed and it has now been killed without criticism of the work,” Rose shared.

A team of researchers in Great Britain came to a similar conclusion that children are naturally immune to virus. People should keep in mind that all vaccines available are only those known as having emergency use authorization (EUA).

Brighteon.TV

Federal and state laws forcing parents to obey

At the federal level, the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) has defined child abuse and neglect as “any recent act or failure to act on the part of a parent or caregiver that results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation or an act or failure to act that present an imminent risk of serious harm.” 

A publication in the Child Welfare Information Gateway reported that approximately 42 states and the American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands define abuse as “including acts or circumstances that threaten the child with harm or substantial risk of harm to the child’s health or welfare.” The word “approximately” is used to stress the fact that the states often amend their laws. 

Neglect, on the other hand, is frequently defined as the “failure of a parent or other person with responsibility for the child to provide medical care or supervision to the degree that the child’s health, safety and well-being are threatened with harm.”

Ten states specifically define medical neglect as “failing to provide any special medical treatment or mental health care needed by the child.” These include Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Mississippi, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia.

Oregon state law says that failing to provide adequate medical care is child abuse, and failing to vaccinate a child during an outbreak is considered as child abuse in some states.

A study examining the relation of vaccine refusal and medical neglect under child welfare laws presented several public health implications, one of which states: “Invoking child welfare laws to improve compliance with vaccine recommendations deserves caution,” because so few courts have addressed whether vaccine refusal constitutes medical neglect. 

In the absence of a direct statutory mandate, state public health officials should issue clear and explicit guidance for providers and Child Protection Services (CPS) as to “whether vaccine refusals constitute medical neglect.” 

The study concludes by enjoining state lawmakers to debate whether vaccine refusals constitute medical neglect and incorporate their conclusions into state statues.

“There haven’t been any liability lawsuits filed against parents who failed to vaccinate their children,” said Dorit Rubinstein Reiss, a professor of law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law who writes frequently about vaccination policy and law.

“Non-vaccination was pretty rare until the ’80s and ’90s, so we haven’t had enough preventable disease transmission to raise a lot of claims,” Reiss said. “If we have more harm caused by this, it’s inevitable that a lawsuit will happen at some point. I don’t think lawsuits are a very strong deterrent, but I think it is important to have compensation for the child, who shouldn’t have to pay the price for these decisions.”

Watch the video below about COVID vaccination of children.

This video is from the WONG channel on Brighteon.com.

Follow Immunization.news for more information related to coronavirus vaccines.

Sources include:

CNBC.com

ChildWelfare.gov

OregonLive.com

HealthLine.com

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov

Brighteon.com 

www.naturalnews.com

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